Do the EPA’s CO2 Rules Go Too Far?



On June 2, 2014, the Obama Administration took action that would require a 30 percent cut in carbon emissions at fossil fuel-burning power plants by 2030. Some industry representatives and state officials contend that the goals are unattainable, and the required shut-down of even a fraction of the coal-burning power plants required will put several power grids at risk, particularly during the upcoming winter season. Regulators site cost-benefit claims of seven to one – that is, for every dollar expended on compliance, seven dollars will be saved in other areas, largely health care. Are the rules likely to be finalized? If so, how must such reductions be accomplished? How much latitude will states and private actors have in meeting the new requirements?

The Federalist Society’s Environmental Law & Property Rights Practice Groups presented this panel on “Do the EPA’s CO2 Rules Go Too Far?” on Saturday, November 15, during the 2014 National Lawyers Convention.

–Mr. Paul Bailey, Senior Vice President for Federal Affairs and Policy, American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity
–Mr. Elbert Lin, Solicitor General, State of West Virginia
–Prof. Robert Percival, Robert F. Stanton Professor of Law and Director, Environmental Law Program, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law
–Mr. Robert M. Sussman, Principal, Sussman & Associates and former Senior Policy Counsel to EPA Administrator and EPA Deputy Administrator
–Moderator: Hon. Frank H. Easterbrook, U.S. Court of Appeals, Seventh Circuit

Mayflower Hotel
Washington, DC


Post time: Sep-29-2017